Infrastructure of the Internet

Squatting Domain Names: Is It Profitable?

March 29th, 2017

Squatting Domain Names: Is It Profitable?

In the early days of the Internet, many businesses were slow to see the commercial potential of this new platform. Many businesspeople viewed the nascent web as the plaything of geeks and computer programmers, so they failed to grasp how this interconnected network of servers could apply to them.

As a result, many of the most coveted domain names went unclaimed for a surprisingly long period of time. There were, however, a few enterprising individuals and business owners who did see the potential. Just like the squatters that populated the Old West and helped it grow, those early Internet entrepreneurs scooped up the best domain names, later reselling them for a handsome profit.

In many ways, the virtual world is just like its brick-and-mortar counterpart, with real estate claims and good and bad neighborhoods. If you are the owner of a financial advice company, wouldn’t it have been great to lock down money.com when it was still available? If you want to become the Internet’s best news source, news.com would have been a great buy.

Unfortunately, those high-value domain names are no longer for sale, and if they were, the prices would be out of reach for all but the wealthiest corporations. Now, however, there is a new Internet in town, complete with a brand new domain registrar that could give business owners and entrepreneurs another shot at the best domain names.

The rules are a bit different for this new kind of Internet. While the current Internet is the Wild West–with all the good and bad things that entails–this new style of online interconnection seeks to create a safe community where users know one another, and where the information they find can be trusted. No more fake news, no more hiding behind phony profiles, no more hijacking social media profiles and no more wondering if the person on the other end of the Internet connection is really who they say they are.

If you want to stake your claim in this brave new world, you first need to know the rules. If you are the current owner of the domain you seek, and that domain is in active use on the old Internet, you will need to verify that ownership before you can purchase the same domain on the new Internet. If the domain you want is not being used on the old Internet, you can buy it on the new Internet.

 

If the domain you have your eye on has been purchased on the old Internet but is not in use, or is in a parked state, you can apply to buy it on the new Internet. You will not have to pay the $50,000 fee, and you can get the domain you have always wanted, all thanks to the new Internet.

Even after all these years, the Internet remains a valuable form of real estate. Some online properties have gone up over time, others have declined in value, and others have remained largely the same. A brand new land grab is underway, and you do not want to miss your chance to get in on the ground floor of a whole new Internet.